Dentrix Ideas

The user/staff id of the person entering transactions to appear with transactions on ledger

Would like the user/staff id of the person entering transactions to appear with transactions on the Ledger. Alternatively, would like this information available through the Audit Trail and include the computer the transaction was entered on.
  • Guest
  • Jul 9 2019
  • Likely to Implement
  • Jul 9, 2019

    Admin response

    Question: What Information would you like to see tracked on this? (Provider, Amount, Procedure, Note, Status, Everything?)
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  • Amy commented
    9 Feb 07:31pm

    Everything. It would be nice to see everything tracked in all modules. Who posted/deleted a payment (insurance & personal), generated a claim, added/deleted a medication, created an appointment (not just modified), changed a procedure, updated an insurance plan, etc. It would also be nice to have a place to notate these things in case an employee has a specific reason for creating the change. It would also be beneficial to search by specific patient, not to have to generate a report for a time period and search through dozens of pages of data (like if a patient cancels and appt and shows up anyway & we're not sure when the cancellation happened. If we could search by patient, we could see when that appt was deleted, by whom, and notate why the patient cancelled - similar to how the Journal works).

  • Guest commented
    28 Dec, 2021 02:27pm

    Very much needed! Then we know who to go to when we have a question about a transaction.

  • Guest commented
    23 Jun, 2021 07:47pm

    it would be fantastic to have direct audit log access from inside each patient's ledger similar to the history section on appointments

  • Guest commented
    2 Jun, 2020 10:40pm

    This is a great idea for practice security in terms of finances. I'm not sure why this hasn't been implemented already

  • Guest commented
    28 May, 2020 02:47pm

    Everything... especially ledger payments.

  • Guest commented
    8 Apr, 2020 01:21pm

    Great Idea, I would love to be able to track all that is done by anyone using the software.

  • Guest commented
    7 Apr, 2020 02:42pm

    Also need the computer to not move on until the Staff ID is posted. When you make an appt, this needs to be done. Too many just leave whom ever made the original appt.

  • Kim Hood commented
    20 Jan, 2020 06:01pm

    Even if it could just be added to the Audit Trail that would be very helpful!

  • Jim Anglin commented
    31 Dec, 2019 04:40am

    Yes, everything

  • Guest commented
    18 Jul, 2019 02:38pm

    We have a two doctor practice with 4 front desk personnel. The doctors get paid off of their individual production/collections so it is very important that we can see who checked out which patient. The "not me" is a real problem and no way to trace who checked out. How can we help our staff see what was done incorrectly so that it is not continuously happening. What they don't know can not be fixed. Would love to see this moved up in the priority list. 

  • Guest commented
    9 Jul, 2019 04:40am
    YES YES YES!!! This is significant for employment training, reviews and legal issues. I do not believe Dentrix doesn't have this option yet.
  • Guest commented
    9 Jul, 2019 04:40am
    i agree, in the meantime; by limiting the level at which certain employees function in the computer will help...i,e, not everyone should have the ability to edit ins. ,etc.
  • Jim Anglin commented
    9 Jul, 2019 04:40am
    This is a much higher priority than some of the other items with higher vote counts. Dentrix is not set up for security. Although my staff signs in daily to Dentrix with a password and can do so on multiple computers (not a good idea unless an administrator), there is no system, other than the Audit Trail, to track who does what (and when). This past week I found that someone has been deleting claims in the ledger for patients who paid their copays in cash. This allowed them to take the cash and we were none the wiser UNTIL a claim was paid for work that was "seemingly" not done. However, because Dentrix doesn't automatically insert initials or employee numbers into every transaction (such as making appts, taking pmts, deleting procedures, etc), we have no easy record of who did what. FYI: the Audit Trail is a good idea which is poorly executed. I believe few of your customers actually use this tool because it takes more time to try to understand than it provides "user friendly" information. Additionally, I find a serious flaw to be that when I run the Audit Trail and it goes to the batch processor and, then, while I read it online (so I don't have to print 30 pages or more a day), it is available to all of my staff -- because it's on the batch processor, available to everyone. Finally, with identity theft becoming an issue, we NEED to see what staff member is on the Dentrix and WHEN... as well as what they do. Recently, I tried to run an Audit Trail by staff member and was unable to do so. I guarantee you that more thievery is taking place than most dental offices realize -- and we have no way to monitor it through Dentrix.
  • Guest commented
    9 Jul, 2019 04:40am
    NEED BETTER AUDIT TRAIL REPORTS!
  • Guest commented
    9 Jul, 2019 04:40am
    I agree 100% with Jim's assessment of Dentrix's security flaws. Hard-working doctors across the country don't have the time to micromanage their team to make sure that no funny business is going on. So, it's up to the Dentrix team to provide the tools to quickly summarize what's happening in a doctor's office. There is no silver bullet solution (especially when it comes to skimming), but Dentrix is highly vulnerable to manipulation by dishonest team members.
  • Guest commented
    9 Jul, 2019 04:40am
    I believe that the sign in (log on) needs to be changed to facilitate this. I one closes the programs modules in order to protect their individual sign on, the next user must restart the program. This is a huge time waster. I would like to suggest that the modules should require a sign on entry prior to entering new information. This could be facilitated by an automatic log off after a user defined period of time or by clicking to do so. The module should still be running, but refuse to accept input until the next user logs on. Reports should be able to be printed for each user on demand. I would also be great if the entire suite of programs was able to be edited in a manner similar to a program such as quicken or quickbooks. With the appropriate security clearance, one would be able to bring up reports on the screen and edit them directly on the screen rather than printing reports and then navigating to the appropriate module to perform the audit. This would save a lot of time, not to mention trees.
  • Guest commented
    9 Jul, 2019 04:40am
    I believe that the sign in (log on) needs to be changed to facilitate this. I one closes the programs modules in order to protect their individual sign on, the next user must restart the program. This is a huge time waster. I would like to suggest that the modules should require a sign on entry prior to entering new information. This could be facilitated by an automatic log off after a user defined period of time or by clicking to do so. The module should still be running, but refuse to accept input until the next user logs on. Reports should be able to be printed for each user on demand. I would also be great if the entire suite of programs was able to be edited in a manner similar to a program such as quicken or quickbooks. With the appropriate security clearance, one would be able to bring up reports on the screen and edit them directly on the screen rather than printing reports and then navigating to the appropriate module to perform the audit. This would save a lot of time, not to mention trees.
  • Guest commented
    9 Jul, 2019 04:40am
    In my career as a fraud examiner with prosperident, I have been called to analyze the audit logs of most dental practice software. During that time, I have not found any dental software that has a perfect audit trail feature (or security). While most dental software maintains an “audit log”, it is not intended (but could be designed) to proactively detect financial irregularities. The logs are simply records of user activity. For most dentists, the audit logs are cryptic and provide little or no actionable information. The danger here is that dentists become overwhelmed with ‘data’. As a result of this, the audit log is rendered ineffective as a deterrent because it is not acted upon. Many audit logs fail to record important information despite that it is in the database. (a few relational joins might solve this problem for some) Also, in several of the fraud examinations I have conducted, the audit logs failed to provide the evidentiary proof needed for prosecution and recovery. (what the developer thinks is relevant to record may not uphold legal scrutiny) Software security (names, password and access controls) can prevent certain types of fraud; however these conventional approaches are invariably ineffective against creative, knowledgeable, trusted thieves. This is because fraudsters possess a “criminal thought process” that cannot be replicated by software developers, product developers or the dentist. To the best of my knowledge; no dental software on the market offers proactive early detection of fraud even though the heuristics and data mining techniques have established these procedures. Finally, Jim's comment about staff awareness when viewing the Audit Trail is well founded. Bill
  • Guest commented
    9 Jul, 2019 04:40am
    In my career as a fraud examiner with prosperident, I have been called to analyze the audit logs of most dental practice software. During that time, I have not found any dental software that has a perfect audit trail feature (or security). While most dental software maintains an “audit log”, it is not intended (but could be designed) to proactively detect financial irregularities. The logs are simply records of user activity. For most dentists, the audit logs are cryptic and provide little or no actionable information. The danger here is that dentists become overwhelmed with ‘data’. As a result of this, the audit log is rendered ineffective as a deterrent because it is not acted upon. Many audit logs fail to record important information despite that it is in the database. (a few relational joins might solve this problem for some) Also, in several of the fraud examinations I have conducted, the audit logs failed to provide the evidentiary proof needed for prosecution and recovery. (what the developer thinks is relevant to record may not uphold legal scrutiny) Software security (names, password and access controls) can prevent certain types of fraud; however these conventional approaches are invariably ineffective against creative, knowledgeable, trusted thieves. This is because fraudsters possess a “criminal thought process” that cannot be replicated by software developers, product developers or the dentist. To the best of my knowledge; no dental software on the market offers proactive early detection of fraud even though the heuristics and data mining techniques have established these procedures. That said, the landscape is improving. Developers, like Dentrix, are becoming increasingly aware that employee fraud is a real problem for dentists and that continual product improvement is one way to help improve the situation. Finally to Jim; your comment about staff awareness when viewing the Audit Trail is well founded. I've see this cause staff revolt in some offices. Bill
  • Guest commented
    9 Jul, 2019 04:40am
    Along the same lines, I believe we could improve the doctor's oversight if Dentrix automatically posted an un-editable date when a patient is either inactivated or archived. At the moment, the doctor has no tools whatsoever to monitor changes to patient status. The only work-around that's currently available is to have the doctor periodically run the Practice Statistics Report and track the number of active patients. Even if the doctor notices an irregularity, he/she doesn't have the ability to run a report that depicts a chronological account of inactivated/archived patients. This is a critical vulnerability that allows front office team members to manipulate a doctor's practice - potentially crippling it altogether if the doctor is unaware of what's going on.
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